Promontory Point Landfill

Promontory Point Landfill (known as Promontory Point Resources or PPR) is the only privately owned Class I landfill in Utah. Comprising 2,000 acres, it is located on the southwest tip of the Promontory Peninsula on the north side of Great Salt Lake, only 500 feet from Great Salt Lake. It is situated on highly fractured bedrock that is geo-hydrologically connected to the Lake.

Great Salt Lake Audubon, as does some of our partner organizations such as Friends of Great Salt Lake, is gravely concerned regarding the potential for leaching and contamination into the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. We are also concerned about the possibility of a reclassification and granting of a Class V permit, which would allow for disposal of out-of-state hazardous waste such as coal ash. Additionally, we are concerned that SITLA may attempt to arrange for disposal of hazardous waste from the old landfill in the Inland Port as clean up and remediation efforts begin.

The following documents provide greater detail about the history and background of this landfill:

Background and History of the Promontory Point Landfill to April 2020 

Op-ed, published in Salt Lake Tribune 1-26-2018 “Another landfill for hazardous waste from states is not the way to generate economic development in Utah” 

6-6-19 letter to Director of Utah Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control 

Op-ed, published in Salt Lake Tribune 6-6-19 “Do We Really Want to Become the Nation’s Dumping Ground?” 

3-9-20 letter to the Members of the Senate Business and Labor Committee 

The following Great Salt Lake Institute white paper provides an excellent context for the reasons we are concerned about the negative impacts of Promontory Point Landfill on Great Salt Lake:

“Great Salt Lake as an Ecologically Significant Natural Area” 

Our colleagues at Friends of Great Salt Lake are heading up the effort to monitor Promontory Point Landfill and inform the public of all developments. If you would like to get involved in this issue, we recommend you visit Friends of Great Salt Lake.